Books

The Neurodiversity Reader collection brings together work from pioneering figures within and beyond the neurodiversity movement to critically explore its associated concepts and how they might be translated into practice.

The Neurodiversity Reader collection brings together work from pioneering figures within and beyond the neurodiversity movement to critically explore its associated concepts and how they might be translated into practice. The concept of neurodiversity can be traced to the late 1990s and the work of the autistic Australian sociologist Judy Singer (1998), with its origins within the autistic rights movement that had begun in earnest some years prior to that. In the 20 years since the inception of the concept, a strong international movement championing the civil rights of those deemed ‘neurodivergent’ from idealised norms has grown, rallying behind the slogan ‘Nothing about us without us’. Alongside this political movement has been an increasing academic interest in the concept of neurodiversity and how such ideas can relate to practice and service provision.

This collection will explore the history of the movement, the concepts that have shaped it, and where the future might lead to. Through a variety of accounts, the relevance and criticisms of these concepts in understanding ourselves and one another will be examined, as well as implications for practice.

Declaration of interest: I wrote Chapter 12.

Autistic Community and the Neurodiversity Movement -Stories from the frontline

The first book to bring together a large collection of neurodiverse contributors to talk about events that shaped the movement, and which they themselves were involved with. Focuses on activists’ direct experience effecting change for people who identify as autistic rather than abstract accounts that reflect on autism’s social construction or essence. Provides a one-stop shop for readers interested in the history and ideas of the neurodiversity movement and how these ideas have shaped production of expert and especially lay knowledge about autism. Gathers a collective of autistic activist/academic voices and engages in current theoretical debates around knowledge production and epistemic authority within (critical) research on autism. Download Book PDF – https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2F978-981-13-8437-0

Ten Rules for Ensuring People with Learning Disabilities and Those Who Are On The Autism Spectrum Develop ‘Challenging Behaviour’and maybe what to do about it. Dr Damian Milton, Richard Mills, Simon Jones.

A full-colour, pocket-sized booklet that aims to spark thought and discussion on how we can better understand those on the autism spectrum and/or with learning Difficulties. Written in the ‘voice’ of someone with autism, this booklet directly addresses the many practices and assumptions that cause so many problems for children and adults with autism and learning difficulties and their family, friends and carers. The ‘ten rules’ concept sets out to be deliberately provocative and is the first in a series that will address the topic of autism and how not to do things.

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